Morning Report: Dana White says ‘Mayhem’ Miller ‘deserved what he got from Uriah Hall’

In promotion of this week’s upcoming UFC Fight Nights, Dana White elaborated on his feelings regarding the recent skirmish between Ultimate Fighter standout Uriah Hall and retired fighter Jason Miller. Days following the incident, White remarked on Twitter that rather than suspend Hall, he’d more likely give him a bonus.

Now, White explains this logic by saying Hall gave Miller what he deserved.

“We don’t ever want our fighters fighting outside of the Octagon, but guess what? There’s gonna be situations where men need to handle their business and that’s one of those cases. First of all, Mayhem Miller, how this guy is still walking the f***ing streets of America is beyond me, number one. Number two, he deserved what he got from Uriah Hall. It’s no different from the situation with Roger Huerta, right? Roger Huerta was in a situation where a guy punched a girl in the face and knocked her out, knocked her unconscious. Then Roger Huerta knocked him out. There’s gonna be cases where I don’t give a s**t.”

The UFC’s Conduct Policy reserves the right to disciple its contracted athletes for actions detrimental to the promotion, including the use of physical violence against others. Given the structure of the policy, it’s hard to imagine Miller not having been severely reprimanded for his part in the brush up had he been under contract.

Hall faces Chris Leben at UFC 168 on Dec. 28.

Star-divide

5 MUST-READ STORIES

No pressure. He’s currently next in line for the UFC middleweight title, but Vitor Belfort loses that status with a loss to Dan Henderson at UFC Fight Night 32.

Next for Gus. With Antônio Rogério Nogueira falling out due to injury, Alexander Gustafsson will now face Jimi Manuwa next March in London.

20 in 20. Chuck Mindenhall’s series reaches 2005, when Stephan Bonnar and Forrest Griffin put on arguably the UFC’s biggest fight to date.

Karma. The back and forth continues between Dana White and Bellator CEO Bjorn Rebney.

Mainstream. The UFC, and MMA in general, have a long way to go to reach the greater masses.

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MEDIA STEW

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Fight for the Troops: Official Weigh-In.

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Dan Henderson back on TRT.

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Behind the scenes at Bellator 106. Alvarez also gets into it with one of Chandler’s guys at the end.

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Tarec Saffiedine “I’m the most underrated Strikeforce Champion coming into the UFC”

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EA Sports UFC trailer. Still waiting on gameplay footage.

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Don Frye says he was partying harder than he was fighting. My god.

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This video is worth it for the soundtrack alone. Can anyone name them all? I got most of them.

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TWEETS

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Ready for the troops.

Bonus Glover.

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Chatter at the weigh-ins spills to twitter.

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Upgrade?

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Hittin’ the leg press.

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Better call Saul.

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Album?

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Comeback?

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FIGHT ANNOUNCEMENTS

Announced yesterday (Nov. 5 2013)

cancelled Vaughan Lee vs. Sergio Pettis at UFC 167

Kiichi Kunimoto vs. Hyun Gyu Lim at UFC Fight Night 34

Shunichi Shimizu vs. Kyung Ho Kang at UFC Fight Night 34

Alexander Volkov and Vitaly Minakov moved from Bellator 109 to Bellator 108

added Alexander Shlemenko vs. Doug Marshall moved from Bellator 108 to Bellator 109

Star-divide

FANPOST OF THE DAY

Today’s Fanpost of the Day comes viaMarc Donnay

Melendez vs. Sanchez: The making of a modern classic

“Classic fight”. It’s a phrase that has been ever-present in the jargon of combat sports since time immemorial.

Recently, legions of fans and commentators have put Melendez vs. Sanchez into this bracket without hesitation. And how could you not? Mike Goldberg had christened it “The Mexican World War” for crying out loud – and that was even before we had heard the final bell. The badass nickname – surely that’s the hallmark of every classic bout?

But what really makes a classic?

For many fans, Jones vs. Gustafsson fits the bill perfectly – an underdog story which took everybody by surprise. Neither fans or bookmakers were willing to give the challenger a chance, and although the marketing of the bout was centred on how the fighters’ physical similarities meant Jones was in for his first legitimate challenge – one in which his height and reach would not be deemed unfair by his cult of critics – it still gave equal thrust to the alternative questions it posed: what would those critics say when an opponent of near-identical dimensions was crushed like all those that came before him? And who could possibly challenge next?

Those questions were quickly answered in the first two rounds – well not answered, more thrown out of court with disdain by Gustaffson who quickly established that his rangy, accurate boxing and light footwork would give Jones the gruelling dogfight he had claimed to have craved.

Check out the rest of the post here.

Star-divide

Found something you’d like to see in the Morning Report? Just hit me up on Twitter @SaintMMA and we’ll include it in tomorrow’s column.

Source: http://www.mmafighting.com/2013/11/6/5070216/morning-report-dana-white-mayhem-miller-uriah-hall-ufc-rebney-griffin-belfort-mma-news
Tags: Peter Gunz   The Blacklist   dexter   Brian Hoyer   burn notice  

Bringing out the best in X-ray crystallography data

Bringing out the best in X-ray crystallography data

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Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
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DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


“Function follows form” might have been written to describe proteins, as the M. C. Escher-esque folds and twists of nature’s workhorse biomolecules enables each to carry out its specific responsibilities. Technology’s workhorse for determining protein structures is X-ray protein crystallography, in which a beam of x-rays sent through a crystallized protein is scattered by the protein’s atoms, creating a diffraction pattern of dots that can be reconstructed by computer into a 3D model.

While synchrotron radiation facilities, such as Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, have been a boon to the field of protein crystallography, providing increasingly higher resolution structures over increasingly shorter time-spans, the technology is still a challenge. For some molecules, especially large molecular complexes, it is often only possible to obtain low-resolution experimental data, which means models are difficult to make and must be manually refined using computer modeling.

“Refinement of protein and other biomolecular structural models against low-resolution crystallographic data has been limited by the ability of current methods to converge on a structure with realistic geometry,” says Paul Adams, a bioengineer with Berkeley Lab’s Physical Biosciences Division and leading authority on x-ray crystallography, who, starting in 2000, has been leading the development of a highly successful software program called PHENIX (Python-based Hierarchical ENvironment for Integrated Xtallography) that automates crystallography data analysis.

Now, Adams and a team that included Nathaniel Echols in his research group, and Frank DiMaio with the research group of David Baker at the University of Washington, have developed a new method for refining crystallographic data that combines aspects of PHENIX with aspects of Rosetta, the most widely used software for the prediction and design of the three-dimensional structure of proteins and other large biomolecules.

The Rosetta program, which was originally developed by Baker and his research group, utilizes a detailed all-atom force field plus a diverse set of search procedures for the creation of its 3D models. PHENIX assembles 3D models atom-by-atom through the extraction of the best data from X-ray measurements. One of the most important components of PHENIX is “phenix.refine,” a program for improving these models against the X-ray data using maximum likelihood methods. It was this feature that was combined with Rosetta.

“Our new method integrates the Rosetta and PHENIX programs directly in a flexible framework that allows it to be adapted to a wide variety of different scenarios,” says Echols. “The main advantage of our method is that it can aggressively optimize models to fit the data and also present realistic geometry. In general, it has been difficult to come up with methods that handle both of these demands. As a result, crystallographers have either spent a lot of time fixing errors, or the published structures end up being of poor quality.”

Echols is one of two lead authors, along with DiMaio, of a paper in Nature Methods describing this work. The paper is titled “Improved low-resolution crystallographic refinement with Phenix and Rosetta.” In addition to Adams and Baker, other co-authors are Jeffrey Headd and Thomas Terwilliger. Adams and Baker are the corresponding authors.

###

Funding for this research was provided by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.



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Bringing out the best in X-ray crystallography data

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

5-Nov-2013

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Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


“Function follows form” might have been written to describe proteins, as the M. C. Escher-esque folds and twists of nature’s workhorse biomolecules enables each to carry out its specific responsibilities. Technology’s workhorse for determining protein structures is X-ray protein crystallography, in which a beam of x-rays sent through a crystallized protein is scattered by the protein’s atoms, creating a diffraction pattern of dots that can be reconstructed by computer into a 3D model.

While synchrotron radiation facilities, such as Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, have been a boon to the field of protein crystallography, providing increasingly higher resolution structures over increasingly shorter time-spans, the technology is still a challenge. For some molecules, especially large molecular complexes, it is often only possible to obtain low-resolution experimental data, which means models are difficult to make and must be manually refined using computer modeling.

“Refinement of protein and other biomolecular structural models against low-resolution crystallographic data has been limited by the ability of current methods to converge on a structure with realistic geometry,” says Paul Adams, a bioengineer with Berkeley Lab’s Physical Biosciences Division and leading authority on x-ray crystallography, who, starting in 2000, has been leading the development of a highly successful software program called PHENIX (Python-based Hierarchical ENvironment for Integrated Xtallography) that automates crystallography data analysis.

Now, Adams and a team that included Nathaniel Echols in his research group, and Frank DiMaio with the research group of David Baker at the University of Washington, have developed a new method for refining crystallographic data that combines aspects of PHENIX with aspects of Rosetta, the most widely used software for the prediction and design of the three-dimensional structure of proteins and other large biomolecules.

The Rosetta program, which was originally developed by Baker and his research group, utilizes a detailed all-atom force field plus a diverse set of search procedures for the creation of its 3D models. PHENIX assembles 3D models atom-by-atom through the extraction of the best data from X-ray measurements. One of the most important components of PHENIX is “phenix.refine,” a program for improving these models against the X-ray data using maximum likelihood methods. It was this feature that was combined with Rosetta.

“Our new method integrates the Rosetta and PHENIX programs directly in a flexible framework that allows it to be adapted to a wide variety of different scenarios,” says Echols. “The main advantage of our method is that it can aggressively optimize models to fit the data and also present realistic geometry. In general, it has been difficult to come up with methods that handle both of these demands. As a result, crystallographers have either spent a lot of time fixing errors, or the published structures end up being of poor quality.”

Echols is one of two lead authors, along with DiMaio, of a paper in Nature Methods describing this work. The paper is titled “Improved low-resolution crystallographic refinement with Phenix and Rosetta.” In addition to Adams and Baker, other co-authors are Jeffrey Headd and Thomas Terwilliger. Adams and Baker are the corresponding authors.

###

Funding for this research was provided by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.



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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/dbnl-bot110513.php
Category: Wojciech Braszczok   Kenichi Ebina   Eiza Gonzalez   Phillip Lim Target   Dick Van Dyke  

New tool may unveil inhabitable worlds

New tool may unveil inhabitable worlds

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Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

SPIRou, a near-infrared spectropolarimeter, will also investigate the birth of Sun-like stars and their planets

This news release is available in French.

Funding for SPIRou, a spectropolarimeter and a high-precision velocimeter optimized for both the detection of habitable Earth twins orbiting around nearby red dwarf stars and the study of the formation of Sun-like stars and their planets, was confirmed today by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) observatory. University of Montreal and France’s Institut de Plantologie et d’Astrophysique de Grenoble lead the international consortium that manages the SPIRou project. “SPIRou is a spectropolarimeter it decomposes light from stars into elementary colors and vibration modes. It is also a high-precision velocimeter, capable of recording the tiny motions of a star that probe the presence of an orbiting planet,” explained SPIRou premier investigator Ren Doyon, a University of Montreal professor and director of the Mont-Mgantic Observatory. “It’s like a radar speed gun, but rather than detecting excess or unusual velocity of an observed star, it finds the regular and periodic variations of its velocity.” The construction of SPIRou will start in 2014, for installation in Toulouse, France, in 2016 and the first light to result from the new tool will be perceived at the CFH telescope in 2017.

SPIRou will be able to hunt Earth-like planets orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby red-dwarf stars. The atmospheres of these Earth “twins” will then be scrutinized for the potential presence of water and other life-related molecules with instruments such as the James Webb Space Telescope that will be launched in 2018. “How do stars and planets come to life? How do magnetic fields impact their birth? Is our Earth one of the few planets in the Milky Way capable of hosting liquid water on its surface, or is it just one in a multitude? SPIRou, CFH Telescope’s next-generation instrument, will investigate these astronomer-intriguing major questions over the coming decade,” Doyon said. Doyon is in fact also the premier investigator of the FGS/NIRISS instrument that is being installed on the Webb telescope, an instrument dedicated to the search and the study of exoplanets and their atmosphere.

SPIRou: a major technical challenge.

To optimally observe celestial bodies as cool as red-dwarf stars (whose surface temperatures barely match that of standard halogen bulbs) SPIRou must work in the infrared, meaning that the heart of the instrument, the high-resolution spectrograph, must be installed within a cryogenic dewar and cooled down to the temperature of liquid nitrogen (-200C). This is to prevent the ambient thermal radiation from outshining the dim light from the red dwarf stars that SPIRou collects and deciphers. Moreover, the temperature within the cryogenic dewar will have to be exceptionally stable, to within a few thousandth of a degree, to enable SPIRou to detect the nanometric motions of stellar spectra that will reveal the existence of habitable Earth-like planets. Universit de Montral researchers have met this challenge, having designed SPIRou’s camera and infrared detector. Their colleagues at Universit Laval contributed expertise in optical design.

SPIRou will be installed at the CFH Telescope, a sentinel of the starry skies atop the 4,200 m Maunea Kea extinct volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island. Although the 3.6 m telescope boasts top-grade instrumentation and is located in one of the best astronomical sites in the world, competition is fierce and so the observatory has adopted an ambitious science policy in order to continuously innovate and remain in a leading position amongst the world’s giant telescopes. SPIRou is one of the key instruments that should guarantee the future of the telescope over the next decade. In addition to the commitments that the CFHT has announced today, the SPIRou construction budget includes the support a large and international consortium of universities and research laboratories.


###


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New tool may unveil inhabitable worlds

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

4-Nov-2013

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Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

SPIRou, a near-infrared spectropolarimeter, will also investigate the birth of Sun-like stars and their planets

This news release is available in French.

Funding for SPIRou, a spectropolarimeter and a high-precision velocimeter optimized for both the detection of habitable Earth twins orbiting around nearby red dwarf stars and the study of the formation of Sun-like stars and their planets, was confirmed today by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) observatory. University of Montreal and France’s Institut de Plantologie et d’Astrophysique de Grenoble lead the international consortium that manages the SPIRou project. “SPIRou is a spectropolarimeter it decomposes light from stars into elementary colors and vibration modes. It is also a high-precision velocimeter, capable of recording the tiny motions of a star that probe the presence of an orbiting planet,” explained SPIRou premier investigator Ren Doyon, a University of Montreal professor and director of the Mont-Mgantic Observatory. “It’s like a radar speed gun, but rather than detecting excess or unusual velocity of an observed star, it finds the regular and periodic variations of its velocity.” The construction of SPIRou will start in 2014, for installation in Toulouse, France, in 2016 and the first light to result from the new tool will be perceived at the CFH telescope in 2017.

SPIRou will be able to hunt Earth-like planets orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby red-dwarf stars. The atmospheres of these Earth “twins” will then be scrutinized for the potential presence of water and other life-related molecules with instruments such as the James Webb Space Telescope that will be launched in 2018. “How do stars and planets come to life? How do magnetic fields impact their birth? Is our Earth one of the few planets in the Milky Way capable of hosting liquid water on its surface, or is it just one in a multitude? SPIRou, CFH Telescope’s next-generation instrument, will investigate these astronomer-intriguing major questions over the coming decade,” Doyon said. Doyon is in fact also the premier investigator of the FGS/NIRISS instrument that is being installed on the Webb telescope, an instrument dedicated to the search and the study of exoplanets and their atmosphere.

SPIRou: a major technical challenge.

To optimally observe celestial bodies as cool as red-dwarf stars (whose surface temperatures barely match that of standard halogen bulbs) SPIRou must work in the infrared, meaning that the heart of the instrument, the high-resolution spectrograph, must be installed within a cryogenic dewar and cooled down to the temperature of liquid nitrogen (-200C). This is to prevent the ambient thermal radiation from outshining the dim light from the red dwarf stars that SPIRou collects and deciphers. Moreover, the temperature within the cryogenic dewar will have to be exceptionally stable, to within a few thousandth of a degree, to enable SPIRou to detect the nanometric motions of stellar spectra that will reveal the existence of habitable Earth-like planets. Universit de Montral researchers have met this challenge, having designed SPIRou’s camera and infrared detector. Their colleagues at Universit Laval contributed expertise in optical design.

SPIRou will be installed at the CFH Telescope, a sentinel of the starry skies atop the 4,200 m Maunea Kea extinct volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island. Although the 3.6 m telescope boasts top-grade instrumentation and is located in one of the best astronomical sites in the world, competition is fierce and so the observatory has adopted an ambitious science policy in order to continuously innovate and remain in a leading position amongst the world’s giant telescopes. SPIRou is one of the key instruments that should guarantee the future of the telescope over the next decade. In addition to the commitments that the CFHT has announced today, the SPIRou construction budget includes the support a large and international consortium of universities and research laboratories.


###


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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/uom-ntm110413.php
Similar Articles: demarco murray   carrie underwood   rafael nadal   paulina gretzky   Gia Allemand Dead  

Limo firm hacked; politician, celeb data breached

An Internet security firm says a limousine software company has been hacked, exposing credit card numbers and potentially embarrassing details about close to 1 million customers, including politicians, star athletes and corporate executives.

Alex Holden, chief information security officer of Milwaukee-based Hold Security, says he discovered the breach at Corporatecaronline more than a month ago. He said he informed the owner of the Kirkwood, Mo.-based software company that customers’ credit card numbers, pickup and drop-off information, and other personal details had been stolen.

“The privacy implications of this are very disturbing,” Holden said Monday.

Car services buy software from Corporatecaronline and use it to streamline reservations, dispatching and payments. Owner Dan Leonard did not return a call to his company for comment Monday from The Associated Press.

Cybersecurity blogger Brian Krebs, working with Hold Security, first reported the hack on his website krebsonsecurity.com, including details dispatchers gave to drivers heading out to pick up celebrity passengers. For example, Krebs reported a chauffeur driving Tom Hanks to a Chicago restaurant for dinner was advised the client was a “VVIP” who required “No cell/radio use” by the driver.

A chauffeur meeting Latin American textile magnate Josue Christiano Gomes da Silva inside an airport luggage claim area with a printed sign was warned: “SUPER VIP CLIENT. EVERYTHING MUST BE PERFECT!”

Other customers include Donald Trump, who required a new car with a clear front seat; LeBron James, who was picked up at an entrance for athletes at a Las Vegas sports arena; and Colorado Sen. Mark Udall, who was traveling to Boston with golf clubs.

The stolen files also include records about what took place in the vehicles, including sex, vomiting and smoking marijuana, Krebs reports.

Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., whose data was among those breached, declined to comment Monday. But his spokesman Andrew Schreiber said he was appreciative that the matter was brought it to his attention.

Other members of Congress also said they were uninformed.

“This is the first we have heard about this. We were never notified, but we are looking into the claim,” said Leslie Shedd, spokeswoman for Rep. Lynn Westmoreland, R-Ga.

Holden said he found the information from Corporatecaronline customers stored on the same computer server where he earlier found stolen usernames and passwords from PR Newswire, Adobe Systems and about 100 other firms. He said most firms took immediate action when informed; Adobe and PR Newswire went public when they learned of the breaches, warning millions of customers affected.

Holden declined to name dozens of other companies whose customers’ data also appeared to have been hacked.

“If we start mentioning the names, there might be widespread panic,” he said, noting that those companies are trying to deal with the breaches. But Holden said he was concerned that Corporatecaronline was failing to act, and that he contacted credit card companies himself.

Corporatecaronline’s website boasts of robust data protection. “The only point of access to the servers is through our firewall, which is managed by our data center, 24/7, 365 days a year,” it says.

But Jonathan Mayer, a cybersecurity fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, did some poking Monday and found the website runs on outdated software prone to vulnerabilities. He said it has code dating back to Macromedia, which was acquired by Adobe nearly eight years ago; Internet Explorer 4, which rolled out in 1997; and 13-year-old Netscape 6.

“The point here is that you don’t have to be a big target to be at risk online anymore,” Mayer said. “This is the new normal, and it underscores the need for improving the regulatory framework.”

The FBI did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

Cybersecurity firm McAfee’s chief technology officer Raj Samani said Monday the hack underscores how vulnerable customers can be, even if they’re trying to use complex passwords and take precautions with their privacy.

“You can do anything you want, but in many cases you entrust your data with multiple third parties, and it’s out of your hands,” he said.

___

Associated Press writers Alan Fram in Washington and Raphael Satter in London contributed to this report.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/limo-firm-hacked-politician-celeb-data-breached-202039785–finance.html
Category: walking dead   carrie underwood   Ozil   robin thicke   Call Of Duty Ghosts  

York researchers discover important mechanism behind nanoparticle reactivity

York researchers discover important mechanism behind nanoparticle reactivity

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Contact: Caron Lett
pressoffice@york.ac.uk
44-190-432-2029
University of York

An international team of researchers has used pioneering electron microscopy techniques to discover an important mechanism behind the reaction of metallic nanoparticles with the environment.

Crucially, the research led by the University of York and reported in Nature Materials, shows that oxidation of metals – the process that describes, for example, how iron reacts with oxygen, in the presence of water, to form rust – proceeds much more rapidly in nanoparticles than at the macroscopic scale. This is due to the large amount of strain introduced in the nanoparticles due to their size which is over a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair.

Improving the understanding of metallic nanoparticles particularly those of iron and silver – is of key importance to scientists because of their many potential applications. For example, iron and iron oxide nanoparticles are considered important in fields ranging from clean fuel technologies, high density data storage and catalysis, to water treatment, soil remediation, targeted drug delivery and cancer therapy.

The research team, which also included scientists from the University of Leicester, the National Institute for Materials Science, Japan and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA, used the unprecedented resolution attainable with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy to study the oxidisation of cuboid iron nanoparticles and performed strain analysis at the atomic level.

Lead investigator Dr Roland Krger, from the University of York’s Department of Physics, said: “Using an approach developed at York and Leicester for producing and analysing very well-defined nanoparticles, we were able to study the reaction of metallic nanoparticles with the environment at the atomic level and to obtain information on strain associated with the oxide shell on an iron core.

“We found that the oxide film grows much faster on a nanoparticle than on a bulk single crystal of iron in fact many orders of magnitude quicker. Analysis showed there was an astonishing amount of strain and bending in nanoparticles which would lead to defects in bulk material.”

The scientists used a method known as Z-contrast imaging to examine the oxide layer that forms around a nanoparticle after exposure to the atmosphere, and found that within two years the particles were completely oxidised.

Corresponding author Dr Andrew Pratt, from York’s Department of Physics and Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science, said: “Oxidation can drastically alter a nanomaterial’s properties – for better or worse – and so understanding this process at the nanoscale is of critical importance. This work will therefore help those seeking to use metallic nanoparticles in environmental and technological applications as it provides a deeper insight into the changes that may occur over their desired functional lifetime.”

The experimental work was carried out at the York JEOL Nanocentre and the Department of Physics at the University of York, the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester and the Frederick-Seitz Institute for Materials Research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The scientists obtained images over a period of two years. After this time, the iron nanoparticles, which were originally cube-shaped, had become almost spherical and were completely oxidised.

Professor Chris Binns, from the University of Leicester, said: “For many years at Leicester we have been developing synthesis techniques to produce very well-defined nanoparticles and it is great to combine this technology with the excellent facilities and expertise at York to do such penetrating science. This work is just the beginning and we intend to capitalise on our complementary abilities to initiate a wider collaborative programme.”

###

The research was supported by a Max-Kade Foundation Visiting Professorship stipend to Dr Krger and financial support from the World Universities Network (WUN). The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funded the initial stages of the project (EP/D034604/1).



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York researchers discover important mechanism behind nanoparticle reactivity

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

3-Nov-2013

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Contact: Caron Lett
pressoffice@york.ac.uk
44-190-432-2029
University of York

An international team of researchers has used pioneering electron microscopy techniques to discover an important mechanism behind the reaction of metallic nanoparticles with the environment.

Crucially, the research led by the University of York and reported in Nature Materials, shows that oxidation of metals – the process that describes, for example, how iron reacts with oxygen, in the presence of water, to form rust – proceeds much more rapidly in nanoparticles than at the macroscopic scale. This is due to the large amount of strain introduced in the nanoparticles due to their size which is over a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair.

Improving the understanding of metallic nanoparticles particularly those of iron and silver – is of key importance to scientists because of their many potential applications. For example, iron and iron oxide nanoparticles are considered important in fields ranging from clean fuel technologies, high density data storage and catalysis, to water treatment, soil remediation, targeted drug delivery and cancer therapy.

The research team, which also included scientists from the University of Leicester, the National Institute for Materials Science, Japan and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA, used the unprecedented resolution attainable with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy to study the oxidisation of cuboid iron nanoparticles and performed strain analysis at the atomic level.

Lead investigator Dr Roland Krger, from the University of York’s Department of Physics, said: “Using an approach developed at York and Leicester for producing and analysing very well-defined nanoparticles, we were able to study the reaction of metallic nanoparticles with the environment at the atomic level and to obtain information on strain associated with the oxide shell on an iron core.

“We found that the oxide film grows much faster on a nanoparticle than on a bulk single crystal of iron in fact many orders of magnitude quicker. Analysis showed there was an astonishing amount of strain and bending in nanoparticles which would lead to defects in bulk material.”

The scientists used a method known as Z-contrast imaging to examine the oxide layer that forms around a nanoparticle after exposure to the atmosphere, and found that within two years the particles were completely oxidised.

Corresponding author Dr Andrew Pratt, from York’s Department of Physics and Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science, said: “Oxidation can drastically alter a nanomaterial’s properties – for better or worse – and so understanding this process at the nanoscale is of critical importance. This work will therefore help those seeking to use metallic nanoparticles in environmental and technological applications as it provides a deeper insight into the changes that may occur over their desired functional lifetime.”

The experimental work was carried out at the York JEOL Nanocentre and the Department of Physics at the University of York, the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester and the Frederick-Seitz Institute for Materials Research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The scientists obtained images over a period of two years. After this time, the iron nanoparticles, which were originally cube-shaped, had become almost spherical and were completely oxidised.

Professor Chris Binns, from the University of Leicester, said: “For many years at Leicester we have been developing synthesis techniques to produce very well-defined nanoparticles and it is great to combine this technology with the excellent facilities and expertise at York to do such penetrating science. This work is just the beginning and we intend to capitalise on our complementary abilities to initiate a wider collaborative programme.”

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The research was supported by a Max-Kade Foundation Visiting Professorship stipend to Dr Krger and financial support from the World Universities Network (WUN). The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funded the initial stages of the project (EP/D034604/1).



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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/uoy-yrd103113.php
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Why Samsung’s Curved Smartphone Display Isn’t Just Hype

Why Samsung's Curved Smartphone Display Isn't Just Hype

A new generation of curved displays for Smartphones and TVs has just been launched. While there have been curved screens around before, they were actually just flat displays with a curved cover glass on top. This time the displays themselves are actually curved and that makes a significant difference.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/CjH_Y6qQcpc/why-samsungs-curved-smartphone-display-isnt-just-hype-1453993230
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Chippy Is A Fish & Chip Shop Simulator For iOS That Puts The Fun Into Deep-Fat Frying

Simulation video games are often purposefully, gloriously mundane. But they can also make the quotidian highly entertaining. And that’s certainly true of this U.K.-made example of the genre. Meet: Chippy, a fish & chip shop simulator game for iOS that’s plenty of fun to play — partly because its subject matter is so spectacularly mundane (frying fish and chips), but also because it turns that mundane task into an addictive game of time management.

Firstly, for non-British TC readers, “chippy” is slang for a fish & chip shop — aka a staple of the British small-town high street, selling battered fish and fat-soaked chips. Traditionally, this comfort food would be served straight from the deep fat frier, wrapped up in yesterday’s newspaper, and drenched in salt and vinegar. It’s about as quintessentially British as a cup of tea.

Now to Chippy the game: The game-play involves memorising orders, and remembering the correct sequence in which to swipe items around the screen to make up each order. If you lose track and leave the chips/fish in the frier too long, they’ll start to blacken and burn, eventually giving off a plume of dense black smoke and being good for nothing but throwing in the trash.

Burnt food also attracts flies, which has a knock on effect on your hygiene rating. You can dispatch flies by throwing stuff at them individually or by activating a UV fly zapper on the wall of your shop to net the whole swarm. But pressing on that until all the flies are pulled to fiery death means you can’t be making up orders so risk falling behind and having angry customers storm out of the shop.

Chippy scores are reputational, based on customer satisfaction, factoring in things like speed/efficiency of order fulfilment, quality of the food (burnt or uncooked fish and chips won’t win you many points), and whether you got all the aspects of the order right or not.

The game eases you in with simple orders, and steadily introduces new elements to ramp up the complexity — so you move from making up a single portion of chips, to making multiple fish & chips portions, with or without salt & vinegar, at the same time and so on. There are also challenges going alongside the basic pipeline of orders. These appear on the newspaper you use to wrap the food, prompting you to ‘cook up three of everything before you open the shop’ or ‘knockout a fly by throwing something at it’.

For the rest of the time, the newspaper headlines are pure entertainment, plus a dash of humour — such as ‘Hipsters alarmed by choice in craft beers’. For a game focused on a single screen environment, there’s a lot of detail to enjoy.

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The developer behind Chippy was also involved in making the iOS pirate game Plunderland – a paid title that was downloaded more than 500,000 times. Chippy is not being made by Plunderland’s studio (Johnny Two Shoes) but is the first game from a spin-off sister company, called Glitche.rs. Co-founder and game designer Maxwell Scott-Slade says Glitche.rs will be focused on “making more targeted apps with smaller development cycles and a slightly different team”.

The studio (and Chippy) is being self-funded. “We don’t have any investors, our mantra is keep development cycles small and cheap — get the minimal viable product out there and add to it in response to fan feedback,” Scott-Slade tells TechCrunch.

Chippy is a paid app ($2.99/£1.99) that deliberately eschews in-app purchases — in part to ensure it can appeal to kids and their parents (who can be wary of gaming costs racking up expectedly). But Scott-Slade also reckons there’s plenty of life left in paid games, especially as he argues that gamers are getting tired of virtual currencies and would prefer a simpler, up-front approach.

“I think [an app being paid] shows an intention to the player. We did experiment with in-app purchases, but never with virtual currency, only to unlock the entire game,” he says. “It’s absolutely nuts to suggest that paid apps are dead. Knowing what you’re getting for a fixed price is important for a lot of players. Listen on the ground and see the general frustration from players being constantly sold virtual currencies — they don’t like it!

“But we also don’t like it as gamers ourselves, the choice to go ‘premium’ was partly due to age range reach but also to support the idea that charging up front for something is still a viable option. I want to prove that,” he adds. ”Another important thing to note is Chippy is potentially quite a niche game, with free you need millions of players before you really start to make any money.”

Being niche, Chippy is also going to have to work to pull the punters in. Scott-Slade says Glitche.rs will need around 20,000 downloads of the paid app to break even and they have “zero dollars for marketing budget.” To help spread the word they have built a gameplay recording feature into the app that lets players share short clips to social networks.

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“Part of the reason we included Kamcord (the CCTV gameplay recording feature) was actually directly a result of Chippy being a single-scene game. There’s not much you can do for a gameplay trailer and it’s really the hands-on experience that makes you most excited. Sharing little segments of gameplay to Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are our best options for piquing interest that doesn’t cost us a thing!” he says.

The studio has also been frugal in its development approach — building a “minimum viable product” and being strict about paring back their list of game-play ideas to keep costs and time down. Lots of ideas they had, didn’t make it in — or not yet anyway.

“Chippy will grow as more people download it — the idea was to build it with the fans after launch,” he says, confirming that new features will be added if Chippy fans clamour hard enough for them, whether it’s curry sauce, pickled eggs or deep-fried Mars bars.

“We had a strict 12 week development cycle with just three people plus our sound designer,” he adds. “Keeping development costs down was also key to us being able to make a potentially niche game.”

How niche the appeal of playing at making virtual fish & chips turns out to be will be fun to watch. “We realised that potentially, not every market would get Chippy. But we’re glad to see that most players seem to really love it — even in Japan!”

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/gsD96BEY8i4/
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